Friday, December 12, 2014

Top 10 Lies of Entrepreneurs (and Investors)


By Guy Kawasaki
Read these two sets of top ten lies: one of entrepreneurs and one of investors, so that you know what not to say and what not to believe.

Top Ten Lies of Entrepreneurs
  1. "Our projections are conservative."
  2. "Jupiter says our market will be $50 billion in ten years."
  3. "Several Fortune 500 companies are set to do business with us."
  4. "No one else can do what we're doing."
  5. "Hurry up because other investors are about to do our deal."
  6. "Our product will go viral."
  7. "The large companies in our market are too big, dumb, and slow to compete with us."
  8. "Our management team is proven."
  9. "We filed patents so our intellectual property is protected."
  10. "All we have to do is get 1% of the market."
The average number of these ten lies that I hear in most pitches is ten. At the very least, tell investors new lies.

Top Ten Lies of Investors
  1. "I liked your company, but my partners didn't."
  2. "We are patient investors who want to help you build a great company."
  3. "If you get a lead, we'll invest too."
  4. "There are no companies in our portfolio that conflict with what you're doing."
  5. "Show us some traction, and we'll invest."
  6. "We love to co-invest with other firms."
  7. "We're investing in your team."
  8. "We have lots of bandwidth to dedicate to your company."
  9. "This is a plain, vanilla term sheet."
  10. "We will get other companies in our portfolio to work with you."

Do you know what the difference is between the lies of entrepreneurs and the lies of investors? The investors have money.

It's not all bad news. Think of everything that an entrepreneur needs (tech ones, anyway), and you'll see that most things are free or cheap.
Marketing: use blogs and social media to promote your products.

Tools: most tools are Open Source and free. Microsoft offers free versions of applications like Word, Excel and PowerPoint in the cloud!

Infrastructure: More cloud goodness-you don't have to buy servers anymore.

People: callous for me to say, but in a recession, people are free or cheap.

Office space: what office space? You can work out of your garage (like David Hewlett and Bill Packard) or just form a virtual team.
The bottom line is this is one of the cheapest times to be an entrepreneur, so go into your garage and start prototyping.
***
Guy Kawasaki is the author of Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions. He is also the co-founder of Alltop.com, an "online magazine rack" of popular topics on the web, and a founding partner at Garage Technology Ventures.  Previously, he was the chief evangelist of Apple. Kawasaki is the author of nine other books including Reality Check, The Art of the Start, Rules for Revolutionaries, How to Drive Your Competition Crazy, Selling the Dream, and The Macintosh Way. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The $7 Israeli device that just might change the world forever

Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 11.27.58 PM
 
The $7 device is loaded with Google’s Android 4.4 operating system. Plug it into the USB port of any old laptop or desktop, and you’ve got a personal computer.
 
If you can put data on a USB drive, why not put an entire operating system on a stick?
It’s a simple but brilliant idea. Nissan Bahar of Israel and Francesco (Franky) Imbesi of Italy are making it happen in remote places of the world where computers aren’t a dime a dozen. They discovered that five billion people, or 70% of the world’s population, have no access to personal computing, and they intend to change that. 
 
The $7 Keepod thumb drive is loaded with a unique version of Google’s Android 4.4 operating system. Plug it into the USB port of any old laptop, netbook or desktop, and – voila! – you’ve got a personal computer with your own password-protected settings, programs and files.
 
Bahar and Imbesi have introduced the Keepod (Hebrew for “porcupine” but with obvious wordplay in English) to a school in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya, through a partnership with the organization LiveInSlums. They use refurbished computers that would otherwise clog landfills.
“We’re breaking a few paradigms in the world of computing and digital devices,” says Bahar.
 
“There are a lot of initiatives for bringing computers to developing countries, but it’s impossible to bring a laptop per person. There’s not enough material in the world for that. Our approach is that instead of providing a personal computer, we use shared computers and provide a stick with an operating system on it so you have your own PC environment on a shared computer.”
 
He likens the model to public transport. “Not everyone can have a shiny car, so you hop on a bus.”
The other paradigm-smashing aspect of Keepod is the notion that fancier is better. Bahar maintains that using basic pre-owned computers without hard drives solves lots of cyber-security problems.
 
“Instead of manufacturing cheap computers — which will never be cheap enough — we reuse old computers. In the US alone, 85,000 computers are thrown out every single day. We can give a big percentage of them a new life with Keepod in Nairobi or anywhere else, and that one computer can serve 25 to 30 people every week. Why continue to manufacture cheap hardware when you have all this material available? It’s an ecosystem of ideas and things together.”
 
Principles ahead of profit
Bahar and Inbesi come from a background in information security and enterprise solutions.
“We started selling to banks and telecos across Europe, and then about a year ago we started to think how to leverage this technology to do something better than selling it to executives,” says the 38-year-old Israeli.  
 

Sunday, December 7, 2014

4 Steps To Increasing Your Emotional Agility

English: Robert Plutchik's Wheel of Emotions
English: Robert Plutchik’s Wheel of Emotions (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

:
It may be cliché but the saying that “attitude is contagious” is true. How you, your team, or your leader shows up is everything—inspiring or depressing, happy or sad, tense or terse. Managing emotions and applying them to the right situation is critical to expression, communication, and mission success.

Navigating relationships is a necessity everywhere in life as divergent interests and scarce resources are always at play, and it requires strong situational awareness to know when to zig instead of zag depending on the personalities you’re dealing with.

To navigate the chaos of communication and relationships requires emotional agility , or the ability to apply the right emotion to the right person in the right situation at the right time. Here’s how:
Understand the situation. Context is everything. To be situationally aware is to interpret the inter- and intra-personal emotions within a group and to integrate your understanding of both with any previously held schemas so as to anticipate the situation’s outcome. Four questions to consider in developing your situational awareness are:
  • Who is involved? Why?
  • What is the activity or situation? Why?
  • When does the activity take place? Why?
  • Where will the activity occur? Why?
The key to the above four questions is to follow-up each one with a “why?” This way, you force your brain to search for an answer to the context, thus forcing yourself to interpret and anticipate situational dynamics.

Empathize with others. You probably never thought you’d be reading an article on emotions written by a former Navy SEAL , but the truth is, mission success often depended on the strength of relationships we had with our governmental and civilian counterparts. More so, nobody likes working with people who don’t understand him or her. To be empathetic is to understand the other person’s issue from his or her perspective; it does not mean just being “nice” and is not synonymous with “sympathy.” Being nice is just that—a state of solitary being—as derived from one’s own individual state, and has nothing to do with understanding the other person. Sympathy puts the other person’s feelings first but can come across ambiguously at times.

Here’s an easy way to tell the difference between empathy and sympathy : Empathy begins with “you” statements and reflect the other person’s viewpoint, whereas sympathy begins with “I” or “my” statements and project one’s own perspective. If you want to maximize your emotional agility agility, let the other person know you understand by focusing on them.

Interpret your emotions. The difference between memorable leaders and forgettable leaders is self-awareness. Self-awareness is what allows you to take your own emotional temperature and see what is too much or not enough and make adjustments.  Without self-awareness, there is no emotional throttle control and the propensity for poor behavior or misconduct just increases. Of course, there is a right way and a wrong way to express oneself. Throwing a temper tantrum in public only makes people want to work against you rather than with you. To test the waters and see how hot or cold you’re running, try this:
  • Every day for the next next week, write down the strongest emotion you felt for that day along with how your physiology changed (i.e. increased heart rate, shallow breathing, sweaty palms?). Include any follow-on thoughts that transpired afterward. Next, identify the source that caused that feeling and ask yourself why? Why did [the stimulus] cause you to feel the way you did? Keep asking yourself why over and over until the feeling has subsided. Playing the “why game” of emotion forces your brain to search for reason and subdue the peril of emotionally based decisions.
Connect the dots between all three. The extrapolation of the above three elements—situation, others, and you—is at the crux of emotional agility, as this allows you to scale up or scale back the right emotion for the moment based on the context of the situation.
Some people need a pat on the back while others need a kick in the back(side), and your emotional agility to navigate different situations and know when to turn the heat up (or down) is determinant of how effective you are as a leader.

Jeff is a personal coach, CrossLeader at the McChrystal Group, board member of  SEAL Future Fund, and author of the forthcoming Navigating Chaos: How to Find Certainty in Uncertain Situations
 

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Miracle Of Life

 
Published on Oct 2, 2014
We often hear by our parents that each one of us is a miracle, but honestly, we truly are. The chain reaction of events that take place leading to pregnancy and birth is nothing short of mind-blowing. This absolutely stunning animation created by Silvio Falcinelli (RenderingCG) and music by Hans Zimmer & Lisa Gerrard.
 

 
 
Published on Sep 7, 2014
Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo forms and develops. In mammals, the term refers chiefly to early stages of prenatal development, whereas the terms fetus and fetal development describe later stages.
 
 

Friday, November 28, 2014

Ultimate Mixtures

The Egyptian Legacy of the Ultimate Mixtures..

A romantic spot in Cairo;
Agha Khan's AlAzhar Park, next to mosque and shrine of Sayyedah Fatima, daughter of Sayyed Husain bin Ali, PBUT..
 
 
 
 I had been there:
 
 
 
 
 

Ferro: A Brazilian Tango..

Forró de Domingo Festival
The festival of the most practiced couple dance in Brazil
 

 
 
 
 
 

Friday, November 14, 2014

How Powerful Is Your Passport?

 
With restrictions at most ports, I was very hopeful to get another..
     
 
This map shows you which countries have the most powerful & least powerful passports in terms of gaining visa-free access to other countries. The United Kingdom, Sweden and Finland top the list with 173 countries granting them visa-free (or visa on arrival) access. The US comes in second along with Germany, Luxembourg and Denmark with 172.
 
 
 

Thursday, November 13, 2014

The Psychology of Colors in Marketing


Article cover image
 
 
Thinking about your brand and your logo? You should be thinking about colors. It's a conversation / debate I recently had with a client and a colleague in regards to our client's website design.
There are a lot of doubters in the world of marketing about the roles that colors play in buying decisions.
So let's dive right into the analysis with a question - one that's specifically geared towards the doubters.

What color is associated with Republicans? Democrats? Starbucks? Vimeo?
If you knew the answers to at least one of them immediately, then keep reading.
If not, then you need to spend a little more time in public.

Here's why there's such swirling controversy surrounding color marketing. Some of it is entirely subjective. For two reasons. 1) If, from the moment you are born, you're taught that the sky is green and grass is blue, then that is your reality. Perception = reality. 2) If, when you were growing up, you picked a favorite color and have stuck with that color, then chances are that color will hold confidence and security to you - regardless of what the color is. Simply put, your upbringing and experiences impact the emotions you associate with different colors.
So let's get a little more into the objective scenarios.

A study was done called Impact of Color in Marketing. This study revealed that up to 90% of quick decisions about products are made based on the color alone. A number of studies expanded upon this, and here are some of the generally accepted color emotion associations.

Green - growth (financial or phsyical) and health. Look at some of the big companies using green as a main logo - Monster, Starbucks, Whole Foods, Tropicana, Spotify, bp and of course John Deere.

Purple - imagination and wisdom. Some of the companies using this color have or have been: Yahoo, Welch's, Taco Bell, Barbie and Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Blue - Trust, confidence and dependability. Companies: Lowe's, hp, Oreo, Facebook, Vimeo, Wordpress, Ford, Dell, Walmart.

Red - Excitement, urgency and boldness. Companies: Target, Canon, Lego, Pinterest, Netflix, Coca Cola, CNN, Nabisco, YouTube.

Orange - Cheerfulness and relationship-building. Companies: Gulf, Shutterfly, Payless, Hooters, Nickelodeon and Firefox.

Yellow - Yellow conveys optimism and forward-thinking. Companies: Best Buy, Ikea, Denny's, UPS, Nikon, McDonalds.

Black - Authority and power. The Silent Partner Marketing, Visa, Adidas, HBO, KISS, MTV, Playboy.

White - Purity and innocence. Google, Yelp, and NBC (in the white space of the multiple colors).

Ever since some of the big Google updates, you've heard this: content is king. While the same could be said when it comes to color from a branding perspective, I'd argue this: if content is king, then CONTEXT is the entire kingdom.
When thinking about your branding, don't think about the demographic you're trying to target - think of the message you're trying to send about your company.

Far too many companies out there make decisions based on what they think people will think of them. That's arguably why society is so politically correct (dangerously so) these days. Focus on who you are and who your company is...and build the branding on that.
Want to learn more about the marketing message you're giving off? Feel free to contact us at The Silent Partner Marketing.

Go have fun. And as Skittles would say: "Taste the rainbow".

POSTED BY
----
Kyle Reyes is the President and Creative Director of The Silent Partner Marketing, New England's #1 Marketing Agency. We're a boutique marketing firm focused on helping businesses grow in an age of exploding technology. You can find him on Google+, Facebook and Twitter. He's the Chuck Norris of marketing. It's outrageous - we know. That's kind of the point. Outrageous marketing - extraordinary results.
 
 


Friday, November 7, 2014

Princeton Study: U.S. No Longer An Actual Democracy

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A new study from Princeton spells bad news for American democracy—namely, that it no longer exists.

Asking "[w]ho really rules?" researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page argue that over the past few decades America's political system has slowly transformed from a democracy into an oligarchy, where wealthy elites wield most power.

Using data drawn from over 1,800 different policy initiatives from 1981 to 2002, the two conclude that rich, well-connected individuals on the political scene now steer the direction of the country, regardless of or even against the will of the majority of voters.
TPM Interview: Scholar Behind Viral 'Oligarchy' Study Tells You What It Means
"The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy," they write, "while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence."

As one illustration, Gilens and Page compare the political preferences of Americans at the 50th income percentile to preferences of Americans at the 90th percentile as well as major lobbying or business groups. They find that the government—whether Republican or Democratic—more often follows the preferences of the latter group rather than the first.

The researches note that this is not a new development caused by, say, recent Supreme Court decisions allowing more money in politics, such as Citizens United or this month's ruling on McCutcheon v. FEC. As the data stretching back to the 1980s suggests, this has been a long term trend, and is therefore harder for most people to perceive, let alone reverse.

"Ordinary citizens," they write, "might often be observed to 'win' (that is, to get their preferred policy outcomes) even if they had no independent effect whatsoever on policy making, if elites (with whom they often agree) actually prevail."

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/princeton-experts-say-us-no-longer-democracy

How Guy Fawkes became the face of post-modern protest


ON NOVEMBER 5TH Britons up and down the country will light bonfires and set off fireworks to mark the execution of Guy Fawkes, a 17th-century Roman Catholic terrorist. More recently activists have appropriated the day as one of mass protest. Anonymous, an online "hacktivist" group, is encouraging people to march against their governments. The London faction of the "million mask march" will gather outside the Houses of Parliament, many of them wearing masks of a grinning Guy Fawkes. How did he become the face of post-modern protest?

In 1605 Fawkes was part of a Roman Catholic group that plotted to blow up the House of Lords during the state opening of parliament. The "Gunpowder plot" was intended to kill King James I, a Protestant, and install his nine-year-old daughter on the throne to rule as a Roman Catholic monarch. But an anonymous letter describing the plans was sent to the King. Fawkes was caught in the cellars of the House with 36 barrels of gunpowder nearby. He was tortured and the conspirators were convicted of high treason in January 1606. The government was particularly heavy-handed in its treatment of the group in order to try to deter future terrorist attempts. The tradition of lighting bonfires and burning effigies of Guy Fawkes began shortly after the foiled plot, and schoolchildren still learn the ghoulish rhyme "Remember, remember the fifth of November".

In the 1980s graphic novelists Alan Moore and David Lloyd created a comic strip, "V for Vendetta", in which the main protagonist is a cloaked anarchist who wears a grinning, moustachioed Guy Fawkes mask while battling against a fascist authoritarian state. The authors wanted to celebrate Fawkes by turning him into an anti-hero for the modern age. The comic was made into a film in 2006, and although it deviated from the original in a number of ways the mask of "V" was a faithful rendition of the stylised image from the book. Plastic masks to commemorate the release of the film were distributed to fans and could be bought online. Two years later, in January 2008, Anonymous launched "Project Chanology"—a coordinated attack on the Church of Scientology’s website which they deemed to be censoring information. Rule 17 of Anonymous's code of conduct, circulated to protesters before its "first real life public demonstration" on February 10th 2008 states: "Cover your face. This will prevent your identification from videos taken by hostiles". For those who chose to wear masks the decision was simple: taking inspiration from the last scene of the film, in which a crowd of Guy Fawkeses watch the Houses of Parliament explode, the "V for Vendetta" mask provided just the cover that Anonymous needed.

Since then the image has been adopted by the Occupy movement, and Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, has also donned a Fawkes mask. It has become a regular feature of many protests. Mr Lloyd has called the mask a "convenient placard to use in protest against tyranny…it seems quite unique, an icon of popular culture being used this way". Although official masks from the film are still available online, most protesters prefer to print or paint their own. And to this day the Yeomen of the Guard, the English monarch's bodyguards since 1485, still search the cellars below the Palace of Westminster before each state opening of Parliament. The spirit of Fawkes, in many regards, lives on.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/11/economist-explains-3?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/guyfawkes

Second Languages Spoken by Countries Around the World

 
 
Do you know what your country or region’s second language is? And if so, do you know how to speak it? The website MoveHub.com is a resource for people who want to move abroad, and they recently released this fascinating infographic that shows the popular second tongue of every region around the world.
Some places, like Canada’s knowledge of the French language, are fairly predictable. Others might surprise you, and this graphic gives an overall idea of the world’s history from the past hundreds of years and whose influence traveled where. We also learn that English is the most popular second language to know, followed by French, Russian, and then Spanish.
So, if you’re looking to take a vacation or make a long-distance move, this illustrative map is your guide to what language a country's residents are likely the most familiar with. Maybe it’s one that you know, too.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Jewish Surnames Explained

Richard Andree's 1881 map of the Jews of Central Europe

Ashkenazic Jews were among the last Europeans to take family names. Some German-speaking Jews took last names as early as the 17th century, but the overwhelming majority of Jews lived in Eastern Europe and did not take last names until compelled to do so. The process began in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1787 and ended in Czarist Russia in 1844.
 
In attempting to build modern nation-states, the authorities insisted that Jews take last names so that they could be taxed, drafted, and educated (in that order of importance). For centuries, Jewish communal leaders were responsible for collecting taxes from the Jewish population on behalf of the government, and in some cases were responsible for filling draft quotas. Education was traditionally an internal Jewish affair.
 
Until this period, Jewish names generally changed with every generation. For example, if Moses son of Mendel (Moyshe ben Mendel) married Sarah daughter of Rebecca (Sara bat rivka), and they had a boy and named it Samuel (Shmuel), the child would be called Shmuel ben Moyshe. If they had a girl and named her Feygele, she would be called Feygele bas Sora.
Jews distrusted the authorities and resisted the new requirement. Although they were forced to take last names, at first they were used only for official purposes. Among themselves, they kept their traditional names. Over time, Jews accepted the new last names, which were essential as Jews sought to advance within the broader society and as the shtetles were transformed or Jews left them for big cities.
 
The easiest way for Jews to assume an official last name was to adapt the name they already had, making it permanent. This explains the use of "patronymics" and "matronymics."
 
PATRONYMICS (son of ...)
In Yiddish or German, "son" would be denoted by "son" or "sohn" or "er." In most Slavic languages, like Polish or Russian, it would be "wich" or "witz."
For example: The son of Mendel took the last name Mendelsohn; the son of Abraham became Abramson or Avromovitch; the son of Menashe became Manishewitz; the son of Itzhak became Itskowitz; the son of Berl took the name Berliner; the son of Kesl took the name Kessler, etc.
 
MATRONYMICS (daughter of …)
Reflecting the prominence of Jewish women in business, some families made last names out of women's first names: Chaiken — son of Chaikeh; Edelman — husband of Edel; Gittelman — husband of Gitl; Glick or Gluck — may derive from Glickl, a popular woman's name as in the famous "Glickl of Hameln," whose memoirs, written around 1690, are an early example of Yiddish literature.
Gold/Goldman/Gulden may derived from Golda; Malkov from Malke; Perlman — husband of Perl; Rivken — may derive from Rivke; Soronsohn—son of Sarah.
 
PLACE NAMES
The next most common source of Jewish last names is probably places. Jews used the town or region where they lived, or where their families came from, as their last name. As a result, the Germanic origins of most East European Jews is reflected in their names.
 
For example, Asch is an acronym for the towns of Aisenshtadt or Altshul orAmshterdam. Other place-based Jewish names include: Auerbach/Orbach; Bacharach; Berger (generic for townsman); Berg(man), meaning from a hilly place; Bayer — from Bavaria; Bamberger; Berliner, Berlinsky — from Berlin; Bloch (foreigner); Brandeis; Breslau; Brodsky; Brody; Danziger; Deutch/Deutscher — German; Dorf(man), meaning villager; Eisenberg; Epstein; Florsheim; Frankel — from the Franconia region of Germany; Frankfurter; Ginsberg; Gordon — from Grodno, Lithuania or from the Russian word gorodin, for townsman; Greenberg; Halperin—from Helbronn, Germany; Hammerstein; Heller — from Halle, Germany; Hollander — not from Holland, but from a town in Lithuania settled by the Dutch; Horowitz, Hurwich, Gurevitch — from Horovice in Bohemia; Koenigsberg; Krakauer — from Cracow, Poland; Landau; Lipsky — from Leipzig, Germany; Litwak — from Lithuania; Minsky — from Minsk, Belarus; Mintz—from Mainz, Germany; Oppenheimer; Ostreicher — from Austria; Pinsky — from Pinsk, Belarus; Posner — from Posen, Germany; Prager — from Prague; Rappoport — from Porto, Italy; Rothenberg — from the town of the red fortress in Germany; Shapiro — from Speyer, Germany; Schlesinger — from Silesia, Germany; Steinberg; Unger — from Hungary; Vilner — from Vilna, Poland/Lithuania; Wallach—from Bloch, derived from the Polish word for foreigner; Warshauer/Warshavsky — from Warsaw; Wiener — from Vienna; Weinberg.
 
OCCUPATIONAL NAMES
 
Craftsmen/Workers
Ackerman — plowman; Baker/Boker — baker; Blecher — tinsmith; Fleisher/Fleishman/Katzoff/Metger — butcher; Cooperman — coppersmith; Drucker — printer; Einstein — mason; Farber — painter/dyer; Feinstein — jeweler; Fisher — fisherman; Forman — driver/teamster; Garber/Gerber — tanner; Glazer/Glass/Sklar — glazier; Goldstein — goldsmith; Graber — engraver; Kastner — cabinetmaker; Kunstler — artist; Kramer — storekeeper; Miller — miller; Nagler — nailmaker; Plotnick — carpenter; Sandler/Shuster — shoemaker; Schmidt/Kovalsky — blacksmith; Shnitzer — carver; Silverstein — jeweler; Spielman — player (musician?); Stein/Steiner/Stone — jeweler; Wasserman — water carrier.
 
Merchants
Garfinkel/Garfunkel — diamond dealer; Holzman/Holtz/Waldman — timber dealer; Kaufman — merchant; Rokeach — spice merchant; Salzman — salt merchant; Seid/Seidman—silk merchant; Tabachnik — snuff seller; Tuchman — cloth merchant; Wachsman — wax dealer; Wechsler/Halphan — money changer; Wollman — wool merchant; Zucker/Zuckerman — sugar merchant.
 
Related to tailoring
Kravitz/Portnoy/Schneider/Snyder — tailor; Nadelman/Nudelman — also tailor, but from "needle"; Sher/Sherman — also tailor, but from "scissors" or "shears"; Presser/Pressman — clothing presser; Futterman/Kirshner/Kushner/Peltz — furrier; Weber — weaver.
 
Medical
Aptheker — druggist; Feldsher — surgeon; Bader/Teller — barber.
 
Related to liquor trade
Bronfman/Brand/Brandler/Brenner — distiller; Braverman/Meltzer — brewer; Kabakoff/Krieger/Vigoda — tavern keeper; Geffen — wine merchant; Wine/Weinglass — wine merchant; Weiner — wine maker.
 
Religious/Communal
Altshul/Althshuler — associated with the old synagogue in Prague; Cantor/Kazan/Singer/Spivack — cantor or song leader in shul; Feder/Federman/Schreiber — scribe; Haver — from haver (court official); Klausner — rabbi for small congregation; Klopman — calls people to morning prayers by knocking on their window shutters; Lehrer/Malamud/Malmud — teacher; Rabin — rabbi (Rabinowitz—son of rabbi); London — scholar, from the Hebrew lamden(misunderstood by immigration inspectors); Reznick — ritual slaughterer; Richter — judge; Sandek — godfather; Schechter/Schachter/Shuchter etc. — ritual slaughterer from Hebrew schochet; Shofer/Sofer/Schaeffer — scribe; Shulman/Skolnick — sexton; Spector — inspector or supervisor of schools.
 
PERSONAL TRAITS
Alter/Alterman — old; Dreyfus—three legged, perhaps referring to someone who walked with a cane; Erlich — honest; Frum — devout ; Gottleib — God lover, perhaps referring to someone very devout; Geller/Gelber — yellow, perhaps referring to someone with blond hair; Gross/Grossman — big; Gruber — coarse or vulgar; Feifer/Pfeifer — whistler; Fried/Friedman—happy; Hoch/Hochman/Langer/Langerman — tall; Klein/Kleinman — small; Koenig — king, perhaps someone who was chosen as a “Purim King,” in reality a poor wretch; Krauss — curly, as in curly hair; Kurtz/Kurtzman — short; Reich/Reichman — rich; Reisser — giant; Roth/Rothman — red head; Roth/Rothbard — red beard; Shein/Schoen/Schoenman — pretty, handsome; Schwartz/Shwartzman/Charney — black hair or dark complexion; Scharf/Scharfman — sharp, i.e  intelligent; Stark — strong, from the Yiddish shtark ; Springer — lively person, from the Yiddish springen for jump.
 
INSULTING NAMES
These were sometimes foisted on Jews who discarded them as soon as possible, but a few may remain:
Billig — cheap; Gans — goose; Indyk — goose; Grob — rough/crude; Kalb — cow.
 
ANIMAL NAMES
It is common among all peoples to take last names from the animal kingdom. Baer/Berman/Beerman/Berkowitz/Beronson — bear; Adler — eagle (may derive from reference to an eagle in Psalm 103:5); Einhorn — unicorn; Falk/Sokol/Sokolovksy — falcon; Fink — finch; Fuchs/Liss — fox; Gelfand/Helfand — camel (technically means elephant but was used for camel too); Hecht—pike; Hirschhorn — deer antlers; Karp — carp; Loeb — lion; Ochs— ox; Strauss — ostrich (or bouquet of flowers); Wachtel — quail.
HEBREW NAMES
Some Jews either held on to or adopted traditional Jewish names from the Bible and Talmud. The big two are Cohen (Cohn, Kohn, Kahan, Kahn, Kaplan) and Levi (Levy, Levine, Levinsky, Levitan, Levenson, Levitt, Lewin, Lewinsky, Lewinson). Others include: Aaron — Aronson, Aronoff; Asher; Benjamin; David — Davis, Davies; Ephraim — Fishl; Emanuel — Mendel; Isaac — Isaacs, Isaacson/Eisner; Jacob — Jacobs, Jacobson, Jacoby; Judah — Idelsohn, Udell,Yudelson; Mayer/Meyer; Menachem — Mann, Mendel; Reuben — Rubin; Samuel — Samuels, Zangwill; Simon — Schimmel; Solomon — Zalman.
 
HEBREW ACRONYMS
Names based on Hebrew acronyms include: Baron — bar aron (son of Aaron); Beck —bene kedoshim (descendant of martyrs); Getz — gabbai tsedek (righteous synagogue official); Katz — kohen tsedek (righteous priest); Metz — moreh tsedek (teacher of righteousness); Sachs, Saks — zera kodesh shemo (his name descends from martyrs); Segal — sgan levia (second-rank Levite).
 
OTHER HEBREW- and YIDDISH-DERIVED NAMES
Lieb means "lion" in Yiddish. It is the root of many Ashkenazic last names, including Liebowitz, Lefkowitz, Lebush, and Leon. It is the Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for lion — aryeh. The lion was the symbol of the tribe of Judah.
Hirsch means "deer" or "stag" in Yiddish. It is the root of many Ashkenazic last names, including Hirschfeld, Hirschbein/Hershkowitz (son of Hirsch), Hertz/Herzl, Cerf, Hart, and Hartman. It is the Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for gazelle: tsvi. The gazelle was the symbol of the tribe of Naphtali.
Taub means "dove" in Yiddish. It is the root of the Ashkenazic last name Tauber. The symbol of the dove is associated with the prophet Jonah.
Wolf is the root of the Ashkenazic last names Wolfson, Wouk, and Volkovich. The wolf was the symbol of the tribe of Benjamin.
Eckstein — Yiddish for cornerstone, derived from Psalm 118:22.
Good(man) — Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for "good": tuviah.
Margolin — Hebrew for "pearl."
 
INVENTED ‘FANCY SHMANCY’ NAMES
When Jews in the Austro-Hungarian Empire were required to assume last names, some chose the nicest ones they could think of and may have been charged a registration fee by the authorities. According to the YIVO Encyclopedia, "The resulting names often are associated with nature and beauty. It is very plausible that the choices were influenced by the general romantic tendencies of German culture at that time." These names include: Applebaum — apple tree; Birnbaum — pear tree; Buchsbaum — box tree; Kestenbaum — chestnut tree; Kirshenbaum — cherry tree; Mandelbaum — almond tree; Nussbaum — nut tree; Tannenbaum — fir tree; Teitelbaum — palm tree.
Other names, chosen or purchased, were combinations with these roots:Blumen (flower), Fein (fine), Gold, Green, Lowen (lion), Rosen (rose), Schoen/Schein (pretty) — combined with berg (hill or mountain), thal (valley), bloom (flower), zweig (wreath), blatt (leaf), vald or wald (woods), feld (field).
Miscellaneous other names included Diamond; Glick/Gluck — luck; Hoffman — hopeful; Fried/Friedman — happiness; Lieber/Lieberman — lover.
 
Jewish family names from non-Jewish languages included: Sender/Saunders — from Alexander; Kagan — descended from the Khazars, a Turkic-speaking people from Central Asia; Kelman/Kalman — from the Greek name Kalonymous, the Greek translation of the Hebrew shem tov (good name), popular among Jews in medieval France and Italy; Marcus/Marx — from Latin, referring to the pagan god Mars.
 
Finally, there were Jewish names changed or shortened by immigration inspectors or by immigrants themselves (or their descendants) to sound more American, which is why "Sean Ferguson" was a Jew.
 
Let us close with a ditty:
And this is good old Boston;
The home of the bean and the cod.
Where the Lowells speak only to the Cabots;
And the Cabots speak Yiddish, by God!
A version of this post originally appeared on Jewish Currents.
Bennett Muraskin is a contributing writer to Jewish Currents magazine and author of The Association of Jewish Libraries Guide to Yiddish Short Stories and Let Justice Well Up Like Water: Progressive Jews from Hillel to Helen Suzman, among other books.

http://www.businessinsider.com/origins-of-popular-jewish-surnames-2014-1
Read more: http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/01/08/ashkenazi_names_the_etymology_of_the_most
_common_jewish_surnames.html#ixzz3HYmHu7Dt

Friday, October 24, 2014

The best places in the world to be a rich foreigner

October 22 
 
This year's iteration of HSBC's annual ranking of the best places to live as an expat, published Wednesday, ranked 34 countries on a host of indicators, such as salaries earned, the expat's quality of life and an expat family's ability to raise kids abroad. The full rankings are in this chart below. Switzerland tops the list overall, with Egypt coming last.


The bank surveyed 9,288 expats in over 100 countries, but only presented findings for countries where there were more than 100 respondents.

Switzerland topped the rankings, as it had done the year before. Over a quarter of the expats HSBC polled earned more than $200,000 annually, but also maintained a better work-life balance than in their home countries. Switzerland's beautiful scenery and lack of air pollution is a plus, with vast majorities of expat parents there saying their children lived safer and better lives than in their previous home, according to HSBC's press release.

Perhaps more interesting is the growing draw of Asia for the expats surveyed, with its booming economies presenting lands of opportunity for expats from all over the world. "Asia emerges from this year’s survey as the best region for financial wellbeing, with nearly one fifth (19%) of expats earning over USD200,000 p.a. and 65% saying they have more disposable income since relocating," says HSBC.

The rankings look rather different when you separate the findings by category. Asian countries may account for terrific remuneration, but not necessarily the greatest living experience. You'll note China is not in the top 10 countries for raising children. Many expatriates, particularly those living in Beijing, the smog-clogged Chinese capital, fear the long-term effects of the country's air pollution on their kids.



Explore HSBC's data in full through an interactive that rearranges the rankings on the basis of various criteria that you can sort and toggle, ranging from an expat's ability to assimilate to a local culture to his or her satisfaction with the country's economy. The report is connected to HSBC Expat, which provides off-shore financial services to clients.
This likely influenced the profile of the expats surveyed for the study. The scores for China and the U.S. probably don't take into account American immigrant diasporas, nor the hardships faced by a growing community of petty merchants from Africa and other parts of Asia trying to eke a living in China.


In HSBC's survey of global high-rollers, the expats in the U.S. do applaud their host country for one thing -- its education. More than three quarters of expat parents in the U.S. state educate their children. The global average in the HSBC survey was only 37 percent.
 
Ishaan Tharoor writes about foreign affairs for The Washington Post. He previously was a senior editor at TIME, based first in Hong Kong and later in New York.
 
 

Veer & Zara

 
Indians are more brave in addressing the "Partition" dilemma..
The outstanding economic, demographic and cultural weights of Delhi had no match to the Islamabad's.. Certainly; the religious pros an cons among both had draw the visions, capacities and solutions..
 
 
I personally believe that the "Partition" was a political plot; which "Jinnah" was unable to properly seed or grow.. On Parallel; "Gandhi" did not object; acknowledging how religion would be a time bomb.. They both had believed that the only defuse is partitioning the parties..
 
 

 
 
 
 

Monday, October 20, 2014

Flames of War



I had spend an hour watching the latest film produced by ISIS; Flames of War; which is banned from public airing.. Thanks to Clarion Project - Addressing Islamic Extremism for sharing..

 I can concluded three issues for the thoughtful to consider:
 
1. Martyrdom is unprecedented weapon in modern warfare, apart from Japanese and Vietnamese heroic acts, which uneasy to deter but Nukes or Withdraw..

2. Media contents have to change to confront these enchanted enthusiastic guys, by deploying new Arabic anchors, facilitating new Muslim task-forces, and play the same but reversed tunes..

3. Despite how problematic the development of a united political will; yet it is conceivable by reduction of political agendas; then the Arabic Muslim civic societies will provide truly effective actions..

I do not address roots of ISIS, yet understand lessons of both Taliban and Tahrik, which speak about conspiracy and frustration..
May Allah swt forgive and accept all souls that were lost in vain..
May Allah swt help Muslims to pass such hard exam..!!


I called them 'Enchanted Enthusiastic".. They have a mixed concepts which act alike the Marijuana that was given to ancient Chinese or Inca soldiers to keep fighting the Phantoms of Evils..!
They sincerely enjoy "Killing" others, while chanting "Allahu Akabr"..


We have now 50,000 Serial Killers.. what to do with them?


Eliminating the evilly-controlled-ones is an essential Islamic Code; which applies to killers, pirates, mercenaries, bandits and gangsters; who generally, unjustifiably and unlawfully murder others.. This Islamic capital punishment means eliminating chronic and uncured symptoms, which deforms the person away from any human attributes.. Because these guys are Muslims, they are lawfully subject to Islamic Penal Code..

Yes, root-causes should be addressed, yet, we should not exaggerate the weight of such sociopolitical stresses, psychic illnesses or defective guidance because a Muslim should be merciful in executions, humble in victories and banned from killing another Muslim.. On parallel, what I called "reverse Tunes" would practically means restrictions on extreme preachers, new vocabularies for media and education, and political well to change which is hindered by unfit leaderships..

I disagree to call them "Crusaders" as those Christian Worriers had a religious cause to free "Holy Properties" from colonial others; while ISIS want to enforce new codes that are disagreeable among Muslim Clerics such as Khilafate, Expiation, Confiscation and Mutinies.. Crusaders had lawful and sovereign authorities to follow, ISIS are not..

I can see the road forward is:


1. Quickly yet lawfully sentencing ISIS members in absentia at Shariah Court of Makkah, then to be endorsed by all courts across Muslim world..

2. Shame and Fame all radical preachers, in order to ban them from public activities, with the persecution support of Muslim "Think Tanks"..

3. Introduce a "Charter of Public Ethics" among all Muslim media businesses, to be ruled by "Public Interest Courts"..

4. Political will.........!!


This is the only structural process to eliminate existing and future evil-claims in the name of Islam.. Compiling both religious and judiciary authorities in one plate..
They came for Shariah; so Shariah would persecute them..
They claim Khilafate, then Makkah will denounce them..
These are the only sovereign, the Common-Muslims will listen to..


Yet; will never happens, because all Muslim lack the unified will..!!


 

Global Hunger Index



I have a sketchy idea that "Hunger" is a "Moral" decline.. not a "Resources" or a "Distribution" one..
Do you share that?


Macro Economics are political, while Micro Economics are social.. Geopolitics is often immoral, while Sociopolitics are..
The meant paradox aims to transform Politics into a moral perspective, while elevate the Politics of social practices..


Disposal of crops' surplus is macro/political; while wasted tomato in festival is micro/social..
I can live with La-Tomatina, Oktobarfest, Cité des Citrons, or Adha's waste meat; but I agree on need to denounce the dumping of surpluses, the use crops for alcohol manufacturing, improper processing of sacrifice meat, as well as the electricity consumption to watch extravaganza's and late TV shows..!!


Macro/political economies do not care for interests of various groups, but for generating an equilibrium between resources and supplies.. Nations which dump surplus in a way or another, are not short of supplies.. But nations of true hunger are.. The rich ones should "morally" provide the surplus for the ones in short.. This would introduce a new (morality) factor to the markets; which would disturb the stable equilibrium of "Greed and Control".. which no one dares to; despite the implicit conviction of invalidity..!

Till decades ago, who had a successful business would upgrade the quality of his business, outlet and household.. There were no concepts of "Branching" or "Expansion" as principles of business management were very simple: You have to Manage your own Biz..!!

Then , post WWII; it was the breakthrough concept;: "If You Don't Grow; You Would Decline"; supported by MBAs and Biz Leaders.. Then we continue to hear about "Expansions" phenomenon till date..


Factually; Greed had ridden Expansions.. Fueling the great evolving supply chains.. This is the fact of today's biz world.. It is hard to reverse the history of biz evolution or seduction of multiple profits..


Agreed; that "Transformation" is eventually and inevitably coming, understandably slow.. but on what cost.. Current hardships will continue to ignite increasing unrests..